Casa

RS

Located in the municipality of Venecia in Antioquia, the house addresses two concerns in the design process: responding to the geography of the southwestern región of Antioquia as a lookout house, and constituting a resting space for its inhabitants. In this sense, sobriety prevails over saturation.

Stone as spatial synthesis

The choice of stone as the main material of the project allows for merging robustness with serenity, giving a touch of rusticity and warmth to the environment, highlighting planes and textures through the chiaroscuro of natural light filtered by wooden blinds in a play of double skin.

The pool serves as a water mirror in the house, allowing for the transition between the exterior and the interior. It reflects the surrounding nature, creating a sense of continuity. In this sense, the water sheet becomes a dynamic material; the pool is the fifth facade of the house that blurs the boundary between the environmental context and the technologically built body, essential for understanding the environment not just as a location, but as a total unit in addition to the project.

The stonelike and the contrast

Contrast is a constant concern in our projects. In this case, the chromatic interplay of the house, which falls within the cream color scale due to the material, allows us to establish clear boundaries between natural landscape and intervened landscape.

From a bird's-eye view, the architectural intention is evident: two bodies meeting in a core that distributes pathways, but a second reading allows for observing a more apparent subtext, that of constructing an axis that traverses the core; the outside and the inside, the water and the stonelike.

Casa

RS

Defining the house within an established architectural typology is a risk due to the accumulation of stimuli inherent in designing in the 21st century. Obviously, it is a house in the tropics, framed within a contemporary language, but beyond the act of categorizing it, we can conclude the following: it's a commitment to reinterpret the traditional entrance hall as a transitional space and transform it into the access point, axis, and lookout of the project. In this way, the house draws from the coffee-growing tradition of distributing the program from a core, which, in this case.